Rudolph’s Tipsy Spritzer

Rudolphs Tipsy SpritzerChristmas is almost here, and many people will be entertaining guests. You might need a party punch that will serve eight reindeer and some friends. Possibly you want something that is both easy to prepare but also impressive. Let me introduce you to Rudolph’s Tipsy Spritzer. This citrus based spritzer is visually stunning, tastes great, and you probably already have everything necessary to create it in your kitchen.

Rudolph’s Tipsy Spritzer

Rudolph’s Tipsy Spritzer

  • 8 oz orange juice
  • 2 ½ oz vodka
  • 1 oz maraschino cherry juice
  • ½ oz lemon juice
  • 3 oz lemon-lime soda
  • Rosemary sprigs
  • Lemon wheel

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This recipe makes two servings. In a cocktail shaker with ice, add the orange juice, vodka, maraschino juice, and fresh lemon juice. Shake and strain into two Collins glasses with ice. Top with lemon-lime soda. Garnish with fresh rosemary sprigs and a lemon wheel. Serve and enjoy; take time to breathe in the rosemary.

For a party sized batch, use these proportions: 5 cups orange juice, 1 ½ cups vodka, ½ cup maraschino cherry juice, ¼ cup lemon juice, and 2 cups of lemon-lime soda. Mix this larger sized batch in a punch bowl instead of a shaker.

Rudolphs Tipsy SpritzerRudolph’s Tipsy Spritzer is a citrus spritzer mostly served during the holidays, but you can serve it anytime – it’s chill. The maraschino cherry juice gives the drink a bit of a sunburst effect, and the rosemary is another unique touch. The aroma plays a big part in making Rudolph’s Tipsy Spritzer distinct.

Rudolph in Pop Culture History

Rudolph’s Tipsy SpritzerRudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer first appeared in 1939, in a book written by Robert L. May for department store Montgomery Ward. The poem was written to have the same meter as ’Twas the Night Before Christmas. 2.5 million copies of the book were given away to shoppers in its first year of publication. Because of paper conservation during WWII, the book was not reissued until 1946, when 3.6 million copies were distributed. In 1947, May received exclusive rights to his poem, and a new print version of the book and spoken word record were published. May&#8217’s brother-in-law Johnny Marks, wrote a song based on the poem, and in 1949, country singer Gene Autry recorded Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer as a single. The record went on to sell 2.5 million copies that year, eventually selling 25 million copies, making it one of the best-selling singles of all time. In 1964, Rankin-Bass produced the famous stop-motion animation special based on Rudolph. The Rudolph TV special has aired annually on television since then, the longest running TV special of its kind.

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About the author

Jöhn is one of the members of the modern day FNDC . In addition to coding and providing content for the site, he also enjoys playing the guitar and watching trippy movies. His favorite mixed drinks are whiskey sours and Jägerbombs. His favorite beers are Blackhawk Stout, Old Rasputin, and Sierra Nevada.

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